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about the fact this is an epidemic or portion. that's the thing we don't focus on. we focus on the alcoholics are the drunk driver. we don't look at the common person's behavior. for women, it's only nine drinks a week in terms of low restricting guidelines. that's not a lot and never more than one or two occasions. taking nights off from drinking and a lot of people would find that something that couldn't manage. >> host: what about young girls. do they fall in the same range as that? i know we look at the age different is in young women and say women our age. you know, finding the difficulty. are there differences amongst the age of women in general? guest of the young generation of women has been targeted by the alcohol industry. in the mid-1990s, we saw the invention of both sleep.cut in fees prepackaged drinks that are basically starter drinks, cocktails with training wheels on a transitional drinks that people into drinking. move them away from you because that women usually don't like the taste of. what happens is they mature into vodka drinkers. so on campuses, you'v
and describing rockwell paintings and i don't think that people really took the time to realize what an original he was. but i think in many ways it goes beyond the in many cases so much more. >> [inaudible] [applause] >>> up next on book tv, after words with debbie hines creator of legal speaks blog. this week, abbe contributing authors to how can you represent those people, the director and supervisor of georgetown law school criminal defense and prisoner advocacy clinic discuss the defense attorneys answers to the professional question the year asked most often how they are able to defend those that commit the worst crimes. the program is about an hour. >> i am so glad to be doubled to interview you on your book how can you represent those people. it was a very interesting and thought-provoking book and i don't say that lightly because if it weren't i wouldn't say otherwise but it was definitely a lot of emotion and ander and sadness and laughter. it basically ran the whole gamut. why don't you start by telling us how you came up with the book. >> we are delighted with the above response. the
i am skeptical because i've never seen entitlement taken away. he made that argument so i don't know if you are familiar with him but i thought you might have an opinion. >> actually i concur with him. entitlement to be taken away has to be instituted and it has to have some success in being implanted. this could be a very rocky entrance and a bomb-making or may not survive. it's not definitive and it's more likely than not that it will collapse of its own weight. that has been what i was advocating during the shutdown. i thought tactically it was a mistake. there was no reason to call for the overthrow of obamacare by legislation when there is not a chance in hell that you could do that under our system. you really can't undo a law from one house of congress. there is no way it was going to be undone and we were heading into october the first when the shutdown began. it was also the day when obamacare this brand-new web site was going to revolutionize their health care signed up exactly six people. i mean, that isn't even enough to field a baseball team. there would be no outfield.
offenses makes them more dangerous. we isolate, marginalized, we don't let them reintegrate so they become more dangerous that is a smart thing to share but he has a personal place how you could represent people who do hideous things. >> host: i wanted to explain that more because just the compilation of people is so interesting to read their perspective be cozened my pointed you gave for not doing the same type of representation and we will talk about the issues but the problems of this system that they are all the same. teeeighteen tell us about your background and how you came to represent your clients. >> guest: i am so pleased that abbe smith included me in the book but i was inspired by my grandfather's legacy as a civil rights advocate came of age in the '60s in mississippi with the naacp and voters league and they were -- he was targeted before i was born and then i went to law school i started to look into lew the law and wanted to practice working on a class-action peace that was my first real exposure to the criminal-justice system and i saw a lot of parallels pacific cisco is l
pius the x. they will kill me if i don't mention it. i remember everything about it. i remember, and everybody was crying. i went to my locker's a good friend of mine was cleaning out his locker for the weekend because the next week is thanksgiving. the odd thing is that i guess he would have to be in catholic school at the time to understand that i remember saying to my friend, he is the only catholic president he didn't live to finish out his term. that's the way we looked at it back then. i was seven when kennedy ran for president and i was so excited. it was the eighth sacrament to be for john f. kennedy and i'd passed out literature in my neighborhood about it. i remember a woman slamming the door and saying i don't support hate this. i didn't know what a papist was and i had asked my father but it was a big deal to us and there was a lot of catholic bridget is. >> host: i was seven at the time but i have a vivid memory of our principal walking into our seven -- second grade classroom. the only two things i remember after that was when i got home standing on the coffee tabl
holding each bead for dear life and i don't know maybe 20 minutes later or so she had to go out and thinthe hallway and came bad she didn't have to tell us anything. she was crying and we knew. >> do you remember that weekend at all? >> guest: i remember everything about it. we were all upset. and i went to my walkers. a good friend of mine because the next week was thanksgiving and the odd thing you have to be at catholic school at the time to understand but i remember seeing to my friend he was the only catholic elected president and he didn't live to finish out his term and that's the way that we looked at it back then. i was seven when he ran for president and i was so excited. it was the eighth sacramento bee for john f. kennedy and i passed out literature in my neighborhood. i remembered a woman slamming the door and saying i don't support a papist. i didn't know what that was that it was a big deal to us. there was a lot of anti-catholic prejudice. >> host: i was seven at the time that i have a vivid memory of our principal walking into our second grade classroom in new y
and saying i don't support papists. i didn't know what tape is was and i had to ask my father. there was a lot of anti-catholic prejudice. >> i had a very vivid memory of our principal walking into our second grade classroom and telling us and the only two things i remember after that was when i got home standing at the coffee table and my father holding me while i was crying. and the drums and sunday coming home from church and watching live oswalt being shot by ruby. what got you interested in politics? >> guest: on wesley john f. kennedy did. that's one reason why did the book. i voice had it in the back of my mind that i wanted to write it. we tried at the center for politics we are doing a big project on kennedy. the book is a five-year project and its 600 pages. if you give an academic another year he's going to add another 100 pages that but we are doing a massive on line course that is free for anyone who wants to sign up. we are doing a special mobile app that's going to have all of the new information that we compiled about the assassination on there. >> host: is it
like an ounce patient we commended this place we don't know what our role is. i certainly have never been a patient before. i didn't know what i could expect of the doctor to get some i've spoken to say that they haven't been -- don't feel well enough trained to talk to patients so there are a lot of different things running around with it can feel like for the patient in that space you have ten minutes to ask all the questions that you might possibly have. so that is a really interesting question. i think the part about numbers is the idea that members of by the treatment is a relatively new one today instead of doing trials on populations the only thing about the 1940's and 1950's. so before that metaphor, historians have pointed out that the role of the patience body to give much greater standing in the process and the diagnosis. there is much less about tests and where people fit into the categories. but more about how the body spoke to us and how they themselves articulate the issues with them. and i think that we may have come to a place in which the numbers have started to do
wasn't a realistic potential. india very early said we don't want you back. we want to be friends of the few but we only that but the pakistani leaders thought keeping the security around will help overcome the ethnic tensions within the country. and so basically they just chose to make pakistan into morgan subnine state. of course that created another problem. pakistan would have had 23% non-muslim minorities. having 3% of your population that is not muslim does not make it easy to make it into a more religious or islamic state. you have to provide for a quarter of the people who are not. it resulted in a situation which 23% of the population of non-muslim declined to 16 within two years. now there are only 3% non-muslims, a very small minority. first came the muslim is asian and then the islamization and then pakistan's dysfunction was -- because the military did not have education. it didn't advocate enough to education in there for pakistan's economic development was undermined. of course american aid of $14 billion of aid since 1947, it has helped but it hasn't created the ec
's new superpower but they don't really care about this and et cetera. so i investigated this all the way to the first complaint and the fact of the matter is that early on, pakistan's problem was getting attention. people in america do not know about this at that time. and so there were a lot of anti-american demonstrations as the country was emerging, its people are potentially hostile. so how do we attract american attention in america, remember, was focused on the cold war. as they would've said, by the way, we need your help to fight in the answer was what can i get it. you know? we can help you. so we had to find people with whom you had a solution in the way to attract that was in regards to the implications for the middle east, authorities, you need to take it seriously and you need to take it seriously in a military sense, not just in providing technical assistance or food aid. unfortunately it has created a dysfunction and now sometimes the hostility that we have generated as a means of leveraging the relationship actually out of hostility with what kind of relationship you want
in the early stage they said we don't want you back. we want to be friends with you, but we don't want you back. but the pakistani leaders thought that keeping enough security around would help overcome the ethnic and regional tensions within the country. and so, basically they just chose to make pakistan into orbit in islam o own nationalisc model. of course there were riots but created another problem. pakistan as conceived would have had 23% non-muslim authorities. having 23 percent of your population that is not muslim does not make it really easy to make it into a more religious. you have to provide for almost a quarter of your people who are not. about the riot was in a situation from which 23 percent of the population of the non-muslims declined to 16 within two years. and that with all of the years it's come down toda to dan pakin there's only 3% non-muslims. so first came from muslim ossetian, -- muslimization and then he islalmization. he didn't allocate enough to education and therefore pakistan economic development got undermined. of course american aid is a trend with $40 billion o
need at that moment? >> so we come into this strange space we don't know our role i didn't know what was expected that they don't feel that they can talk to patients so what could feel like the life-and-death space with all the questions you could possibly have. so i think the part about numbers historically the idiot numbers would by treatment is relatively new. we do trial:populations in the '40's and '50's. and in to take a spending of the process of diagnosis. where people fit in and how they themselves articulate the issues. we have come to a place in which the numbers often too much work with a diagnostic process. >> it seems as if it is difficult to deliver bad news when you are a doctor but to cling to the statistics with the next eddie you need to get done to focus on and everything being great. is there a denial of the waves and lives are limited? here is the pressure that is absolutely true from the medical side of things in the coulter to focus on the positive part likely its armstrong cut to believe in and put the truth of the mentor is it is not the case with people who
are not used to having and we don't know quite what our role is in being a patient and i had never been a patient before and i wasn't expecting to be as a patient i didn't know what to expect from the doctor treated some doctors say they haven't dashed -- they don't feel well enough trained to talk to different kinds of patients so there are a lot of different things running around this really look and feel like for the patient a life or death space. you have 10 minutes to ask all questions you might possibly have and maybe somebody with you so i think that's a really interesting question. i think the part about numbers, historically the idea that numbers will guide treatment is a relatively new one. we started doing trials on populations only in the 1940s and 1950s so before that historians have pointed out that the role of the patient's body took a much greater standing in the process of diagnosis and much less about tests and where people fit into these categories but more about how their body it spoke to and how they themselves articulated the issues with them. and i think we may ha
. why should i assume we don't agree? i would like to answer with just a couple things. fist of all, i mentioned that talking to the tea party is something i believe in. but i was speaking at fresno state university and at a church in 2009 and there was a picketing line outside and i had 15 minutes before i had to speak. and i wnt up to the first guy and i said why are you picketing me and he said i don't know about you but you're a friend of obama and i hate obama. and then a guy came up with a ron paul t-shirt and i said i bet we agree with a lot of things. and he said like what? and i said full gay, lesbian, bi-sexual rights. and i said full rights including the right to marriage. and he said no, i think that is matter for your church or religious group or neighborhood or pals. you can go out in the field and do that. government shouldn't be involved in that. i said you have convinced me. full gay rights, we all get up married immediately. and he said right. and the woman next to him said you believe that? and i said you talk to each other. i am going in to give my talk. but it is a
's to him. you have to start with her teenage romance that i don't think of her laughter. the concept of a first love and teenage that the puppy love that did mature into adult loved. i think rose kept that with her always. we know that her husband was unfaithful to her and so that was a cross to bear as rose would have said. it was not a dealbreaker though. we think that in 1920 after rose had her fourth child, that she left home and went back to her home, her father's home and said i can't do this anymore. we don't know all of the details. we don't know if she was just overwhelmed by having four children in five years or was it that she was having some postpartum depression? was it that she worried about her husband? he was building a business career so it even if he had not been unfaithful he was gone a lot so she was just frustrated and supposedly her father honey fitz said to her you are a catholic woman, you are in a catholic marriage. you must go home and make this marriage work. certainly she did for over 40 years. >> host: it was not an option for her. >> guest: it was not en
the authors have completed their presentations. so we'd like to keep this fair be going for 30 more years, don't we? [applause] so let's do it together, and instead of asking you to turn off your cell phones, what i'd like you to do if you have not already done so this weekend is to take out your cell phones and text mbfi to donate to miami book fair international if you're so inclined. doe that it to 41444. thank you -- donate to 41444. thank you so much. please consider donating $30 in support of the 30 years the book fair has been in existence making culture happen here in our community. it's now my pleasure to introduce dr. j.p. austin, a local physician, and he will make the formal introduction of our authors. thank you. [applause] and he will make the formal introduction of our authors. thank you. [applause] >> good morning. it's an honor and a privilege for me to introduce mark halperin and john heileman. the authors of "double down" game changed .12. i'm a political junkie and i do medicine sometimes on the side. [laughter] but this second book of what i think of now as a franchise rea
supremacy that was perpetrated. u.s.a. history teacher, this must've driven you -- i don't know how you maintain your selection will sanity. you obviously knew this before. but to have it supported in the actual research of this quote, unquote, what we now consider institutions, teaching white supremacy. i am not trying to sound as if i'm surprised, but if you said that now about yale or harvard, you know, people with my goodness, when did they start? how did it get charted? who started it i that because of the people whose target these universities. >> guest: it's in the source of their funding. remember, as the american revolution approaches, and tension between the colonies and england increase. the capacity to raise money and england. it is largely taken down at the end of the 17th century. they start using it. i read it in the book is as a native american military threat in new england to climb, to interest in evangelizing native americans declines with that. it's always been to some extent linked. it doesn't mean it is safe to your desire to christianized then. it was also a strat
. >> guest: i don't know how to put them all together. i thought she was going to say that she saw this photograph, and they were all white men. and i was ready -- but i don't know quite where she was going with this. but the connection to the nsa brings us back to what the man asked -- >> host: perhaps the power in this town and where does it reside? >> guest: well, it certainly resides here. this is the capital of the country, and the power resides with the supreme court and with congress. and be then with the president. >> host: amy, portland, oregon. when ms.-- i'm just going to read it verbatim -- when ms. kelley leaves this world, what will happen to all of her interview and video recording? >> guest: amy, i do have them all. i do have them all, and i've saved them because you never know -- i did it in the beginning to document all my work for lawyers. i don't know what'll happen to it. >> host: you haven't decided? >> guest: no. and when i inherited the archive of stanley's photographs, people said why don't you donate it, donate it to a library. and i said, no, it'll get lo
of, people don't know very much about her and think of her primary as a problem, as the controversy but i turned that in my book was a person. she was a daughter. she was someone's sister. she was someone's mother and friend, and without thinking of her in those ways, putting her in that light is so easy to say anything you want to say about her. you can give her fathers of her children sort of every 10 years based upon nothing because you don't know her, because there is no sense of the connection with her as a person. there's no care with her life. what i thought i would try to do with this book was can talk not just about her but to talk about her entire family, to put all of the innings into the context that would make it easier for people to see them as human beings and not as slaves, not as part of a particular problem. >> over the next few weeks booktv now in its 15th year on c-span2 is taking a look back at authors, books and publishing news. you can watch all of the programs from the past 15 years online at booktv.org. >> several years ago my father told me about a german s
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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